How to Promote a Restaurant Through the Use of Food Bloggers

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Food Blogger

The
methods of filling up the dining tables for restaurants are constantly
evolving, and content marketing has quickly outpaced traditional promotional
methods.
Of course, there are
marketing-savvy patrons out there who recognize what content marketing is, and
this means getting promoted by an unbiased third party can prove
beneficial.
Fortunately, food bloggers
can help with this; restaurateurs just need to know how to utilize these
writers.

Find
the Right Bloggers
The
first step in getting people at the bar tables is finding a food blogger that’s
a good fit.
Not every food blogger will
be interested in certain types of restaurants, and seeking out the wrong writer
is nothing more than a waste of time.
First, make sure that the blogger is local enough to where they can
actually visit the restaurant.

If
an eatery owner wants the dining tables for restaurants frequented by food
bloggers, they should also focus on more than just location. A blogger who only reviews 5-star
restaurants, for instance, wouldn’t likely make their way to even the best
burger joint in a small town. Focus on
the right bloggers, make a list of a few to seek out and start trying to engage
them.

Create
a Repertoire
Once
a list of suitable food bloggers has been created, it becomes important to
begin laying the groundwork to get at least one of these writers sitting in a
restaurant booth. A starter’s list
should have about 20 bloggers, and the first step is following these
individuals on all of their social media sites.


Of
course, simply following them isn’t enough. It’s also necessary to interact with them. Share their content, comment on their posts
and blogs, tag them in updates and post on their pages every so often. The entire point behind this is so that the
blogger at least knows the restaurant exists before being contacted by it.


Initiate
Contact
Interacting
in social media is all well and good, but it’s not really what’s needed to
start a relationship between an eatery and a food blogger. This is the difficult part since a food
blogger could receive several requests from restaurants every single day. This makes it important to stand out.

It’s
not the restaurant furnishings that will attract a blogger; it’s the message
sent to them. Never send a blogger a
press release; this will seem impersonal and effortless. Additionally, don’t let the blogger feel as
if they’re part of a larger blog outreach. Restaurateurs should address each writer by their name and explain
specifically why they were reached out to. "Great blog," "spot-on restaurant descriptions" and
"you have great taste" never hurt.

Not
every food blogger will agree to come in and try out a restaurateur’s eatery,
but this is why it’s important to have a list of 20 to start out with. This increases the likelihood that at least
one blogger will take a shot at a specific eatery. And as long as all goes well during their
visit, the work put into this endeavor can prove highly beneficial, and make an
establishment far more marketable.